Tag Archives: The Wailers

Six Names Added to the Freaks Hall Class of 2017

The polls are closed, the ballots have been counted, and we are proud to announce our round two inductees for the Rock ‘n’ Roll Freaks Hall class of 2017.  In this round, we considered artists and groups who debuted before 1967, and six names finished over the induction line. They will be inducted with the contributors elected in round one and those who make the cut in round three (debuted between 1967-1981).

Please welcome our class of 2017 round two inductees!

 

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Richard Berry

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The Chocolate Watchband

Bobby Fuller Four

The Bobby Fuller Four

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Wynonie Harris

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The Kingsmen

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The Wailers

Album of the Day: The Wailers, Out Of Our Tree (1966, Etiquette)

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ROCK ‘N’ ROLL FREAKS ALBUM OF THE DAY FOR MONDAY, NOVEMBER 9:

THE WAILERS, OUT OF OUR TREE (1966, ETIQUETTE)

Track Listing:
A1 Out Of Our Tree 3:23
A2 Mercy Mercy 2:45
A3 Hang On Sloopy 3:34
A4 I’m Down 2:26
A5 Unchained Melody 4:38
A6 Baby Don’t Do It 3:58
B1 Dirty Robber 2:35
B2 I Got Me 2:10
B3 Summertime 5:04
B4 Little Sister 1:56
B5 Hang Up 2:24
B6 Bama Lama Bama Loo 2:22

AllMusic Review by Richie Unterberger [3/5]

The Wailers’ final album for Etiquette, Out of Our Tree was a somewhat confused effort. It was torn between covers of mid-’60s hits and original material, usually in their R&B-soaked raunchy style, though with touches of influences from British Invasion groups and the emerging American garage rock scene. Certainly its highlight was the title track (eventually included on the Nuggets box set), with its grinding sub-”Satisfaction” riff. But other original numbers on the record were frenetic yet undistinguished rewrites of ’50s-style rock & roll numbers, though “Hang Up” was a pretty fair tough garage rocker. And there were too many covers of well-known hits — “Hang on Sloopy,” the Beatles’ “I’m Down,” “Unchained Melody,” “Mercy Mercy,” “Summertime” — that neither matched better-known prior versions or added much to them, though the screaming white-soul vocal on Hank Ballard’s “Little Sister” is pretty harrowing. If the whole album had been on the level of “Out of Our Tree” and “Hang Up,” this would be a notable slice of wired, edgy mid-’60s garage rock, but too much of the rest disappoints. The album was paired with their prior 1965 LP, Wailers Wailers Everywhere, on a single-disc CD reissue by Big Beat in 2003, with the addition of five mid-’60s non-LP bonus tracks.

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